What did I DO before the internet?

Camp Atterbury, Indiana -- Me, at the USO (United Servicemember’s Organization), using their internet services. The USO runs GREAT morale-boosting recreation centers, shows and programs for the US military worldwide, absolutely free of cost to the servicemember. When I’m not sweating at Camp Atterbury, I’m hanging at their USO.
Camp Atterbury, Indiana — Me, at the USO (United Servicemember’s Organization), using their internet services. The USO runs GREAT morale-boosting recreation centers, shows and programs for the US military worldwide, absolutely free of cost to the servicemember. When I’m not sweating at Camp Atterbury, I’m hanging at their USO.

There was a time when I didn’t have to “log-on” every day. I’m not 100% sure, but I vaguely remember doing things like playing sports with friends, visiting people and doing outdoor activities, and having fun by checking out the local scene before the internet became popular.

That was long, long ago. Now-a-days, I feel “naked” if I don’t have immediate access, or at least potential immediate access, to the internet or some other connected device. I’ve taking a bit of a ribbing because of this lately, so I took some time today to figure out why I feel the need to be “connected” at all times.

My possible conclusions:

  1. Professional conditioning. As a Public Affairs Officer, I’m a news junky … even though I can’t POSSIBLY know what’s going on all the time all over the world, I’m conditioned to try. (Once a General asks you what’s going on in the news and you can’t answer, you learn your lesson!) So, professionally, I feel like if I’m caught without a computer, I’m not doing my job. Maybe that’s it.
  1. Entertainment in lieu of (you fill in the blank.) If you are a geek wanna-be (like me,) you know that a computer can be your television, telephone, home theater, publisher, video game system, bank, and much more. In a place like Camp Atterbury, where NONE of these entertainment services exist, I’m pretty much confined to interacting with my team members. Although I love them, it’s nice to separate and have “me” time … maybe that’s it.
  1. SKYPE. the greatest invention since the telephone is the invention that lets me avoid paying someone to use it. I love videoconferencing with Muna and Taj (for free) to see how they are doing. I guess that even if I’m not talking to them on the computer at the time, if I have it nearby, I’m always ready to receive their call (or call them up, too.) Yeah, that’s it for sure.
darricklee Written by: