It feels good to do good. (If you want to feel good, do better.)

Camp Atterbury, IN-- Yeah, I know, you’ve seen this picture of me before. Sorry, but I’ve been so busy I haven’t had a chance to take any new pics of me lately.

Camp Atterbury, IN–
Yeah, I know, you’ve seen this picture of me before.
Sorry, but I’ve been so busy I haven’t had a chance to take any new pics of me lately.

Sorry I missed you guys … it looks like I haven’t made a posting here in a few days. I really am committed to posting something daily, but sometimes the military has other plans (that don’t include connecting to the internet.) So, the photo today is a re-print … I’ll make it up to you later by offering you some cool pics. I promise!

We’ve been really busy lately. We’re still in the middle of our end-of-course readiness exercise. They’re hitting us with everything they’ve got: ambushes from insurgents, ambushes from media, ambushes from hackers (specifically, our ability to print appears to be under attack) and more. With limited time to rest, we’ve got to somehow work together (as a team) to overcome each training scenario and prepare for the next one.

Today’s challenge was right up my alley. I had to prepare and execute a media interview for my team. When I worked as a Public Affairs officer at US Air Force Bases, I used to complain about all of the preparation and coordination that goes into preparing leaders for interviews. Now, in an environment where we’re getting to learn about each other’s strengths and weaknesses, I actually looked forward to doing something I KNEW I would succeed in. I wanted to instill confidence in my team, so they know that I am able to perform my basic function (as a Public Affairs Officer,) even if I don’t do so well with other aspects of training I’m not so familiar with.

But, then again, the point of training is to introduce you to things you may NOT always succeed in (until you become more proficient, of course.) There are some elements of our training here that I did okay in, but didn’t really do as well because it’s not really my comfort level. The result is that I didn’t feel “good” about the work I performed.

I guess I learned today that although I like to feel good doing what I know how to do, I should probably get out of my comfort zone and learn to get better at doing other things … not necessarily because it’s my professional obligation, but simply because I want to experience the feeling I had today more often.

It feels good to do good. If you don’t know how to do good, try to learn.

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