Communicating in the ‘stan

Talk to any reporter now-a-days, and they’ll gladly tell you their story about the recent state of journalism. Newspapers are falling by the wayside, while it’s harder to get credible online reporting from smaller sources. Here in the ‘stan, the change is probably unnoticeable.
Talk to any reporter now-a-days, and they’ll gladly tell you their story about the recent state of journalism.
Newspapers are falling by the wayside, while it’s harder to get credible online reporting from smaller sources.
Here in the ‘stan, the change is probably unnoticeable.

I’m still escorting reporter David Wood, a journalist embedded with our team for a while. He writes for PoliticsDaily.com, part of America Online.

He, like many others in the industry, was temporarily caught up in the current downfall of print news products (specifically newspapers.) Seems people just aren’t reading newspapers much anymore. So, now he writes online (like almost everybody else.)

While I admit within the US, newspapers are not as valued as they once were, they are certainly valuable in places that don’t have a strong infrastructure to support stable internet (like the ‘stan.) On the flipped side of that coin, many Afghan people cannot read.

Here, we are trying to reach a people whose language most of us don’t understand. And most Afghan people don’t have access to the internet, don’t have access to newspapers, and are unable to read … Can you imagine our communications challenge?

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