Bye-bye, my love …

Edison, New Jersey -- I put my car in storage (at the government’s expense.) It was hard for me to part with my baby. (Can you see the pain on my face?) But, as they say, absence makes the heart grow fonder.
Edison, New Jersey — I put my car in storage (at the government’s expense.) It was hard for me to part with my baby. (Can you see the pain on my face?) But, as they say, absence makes the heart grow fonder.

After moving out of McGuire’s base housing into the military hotel, the next task on our list was to put our cars in storage. Japan has a no-foreign-car rule when it comes to US military stationed there. I was told it is because of emission standards, but I suspect that it’s just Japan’s way of making sure their aren’t a bunch of oversized Chevy and Ford SUV’s with left-hand steering tearing up the road. (They drive on the left-side of the road in Japan, with cars that have right-handed steering.)

In any case, neither my 2001 530i sport, nor Muna’s 325it wagon are able to come with us to Japan, so we had to either sell ‘em or store ‘em.

We decided to store my car on the East coast. This meant that I had to part ways with my love, er, uh, I mean car, before we left Jersey. I took it to a government-run vehicle processing center in Edison. (The government will reimburse me for the storage of one car, and we’ll have to foot the bill for the other.)

There, they did an inspection (kind of like when returning a rental car, only a LOT more detailed.) Once we agreed on the condition of the car, I turned over the keys. I hated to do it. I won’t see her (I mean “it”) for three long years.

This meant we were dependent on Muna’s grocery-getter for the remainder of our time in Jersey. (I’m not knocking her wagon … it’s a great car … just not the same as my baby, er, uh, I mean car.) We decided to store her car in Kansas, where my Aunt Pie can keep an eye on it, so I’ll update you in a future blog post about how the road trip goes.

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